Need someone to lead product management at your software company? I create software for people that create software and I'm looking for my next opportunity. Check out my resume and get in touch.

Fighting Monster patent claims

Freshness Warning
This blog post is over 15 years old. It's possible that the information you read below isn't current and the links no longer work.

Monster Cable sends a trademark and patent infringement notice against a small cable maker to try and extract licensing fees. Unfortunately for Monster, the president of Blue Jeans Cable is a former federal and insurance litigator.

I have no interest whatsoever in infringing upon any intellectual property belonging to Monster Cable. Indeed, the less my customers think my products resemble Monster’s, in form or in function, the better.

It seems Monster does this all the time, extorting smaller cable makers with frivolous legal claims.

My observation has been that Monster Cable typically operates in a hit-and-run fashion. Your client threatens litigation, expecting the victim to panic and plead for mercy; and what follows is a quickie negotiation session that ends with payment and a licensing agreement.

I do not compromise with bullies and I would rather spend fifty thousand dollars on defense than give you a dollar of unmerited settlement funds.

I will advance defenses which, if successful, will substantially undermine your future efforts to use these patents and marks.

via Gadgetopia

Michael S.
April 19, 2008 9:08 AM

Monster is way overpriced anyway. Sure, the quality is great but not enough to justify $100 for an HDMI cable. You can get cables that work just as good (or better) for much cheaper.

mary
April 25, 2008 7:06 AM

I would have to say I think my favorite part of this whole Bluejeans cable is " I would remind you that it is you, not I, who are making claims; and it is you, not I, who must substantiate those claims. You have not done so." I guess my expectations are sustained by Monster's performance...they are not very high.

This discussion has been closed.

Recently Written

Too Big To Fail (Apr 9)
When a company piles resources on a new product idea, it doesn't have room to fail. That keeps it from succeeding.
Go small (Apr 4)
The strengths of a large organization are the opposite of what makes innovation work. Starting something new requires that you start with a small team.
Start with a Belief (Apr 1)
You can't use data to build products unless you start with a hypothesis.
Mastery doesn’t come from perfect planning (Dec 21)
In a ceramics class, one group focused on a single perfect dish, while another made many with no quality focus. The result? A lesson in the value of practice over perfection.
The Dark Side of Input Metrics (Nov 27)
Using input metrics in the wrong way can cause unexpected behaviors, stifled creativity, and micromanagement.
Reframe How You Think About Users of your Internal Platform (Nov 13)
Changing from "Customers" to "Partners" will give you a better perspective on internal product development.
Measuring Feature success (Oct 17)
You're building features to solve problems. If you don't know what success looks like, how did you decide on that feature at all?
How I use OKRs (Oct 13)
A description of how I use OKRs to guide a team, written so I can send to future teams.

Older...

What I'm Reading

Contact

Adam Kalsey

+1 916 600 2497

Resume

Public Key

© 1999-2024 Adam Kalsey.