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More US Bank clueless service

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Not content to annoy me once this month, US Bank decided to call me again. Despite my assurances that the payment will arrive on time, I received a second "courtesy call" in a week, letting me know my payment would soon be due.

I have the choice between two extremes—get harassed each month or stop all calls about my payments. If I have a payment that they’re unable to deposit—say I accidentally send the wrong check in the wrong envelope—they won’t call.

Nice choice.

Chloe baby
March 4, 2008 12:01 PM

That is awful service, but i bet all banks have the same sort of systems. Have you voiced your annoyance about this?...i think you should harass them with calls.

Mark L. Venardi
March 24, 2008 11:36 AM

Definitely don't waste time on the phone with a "customer service rep" (hahaha). You'll only talk in circles and get annoyed. Your best bet is to go down to the local branch and ask to speak with a manager. Once in front of a human being you can explain the situation and they can usually help you traverse the bureaucracy. I did this with Commerce Bank once. Hope this helps!

Unknown
May 1, 2008 8:54 AM

So, you are upset they call you to give you a hand, and do not want them to stop in case there is a mistake. Should they hire mind readers to keep track of when you might want that call?

Steve Owings
August 15, 2008 8:54 AM

They are only calling ya because someone didn't see it in the system that your payment was on the way. It's just a minor mistake. I wouldn't be too annoyed with the bank. They should call you if they are holding the wrong check. What kinda bank is that? Try a new bank maybe that will help. Steve

This discussion has been closed.

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