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Virtual Fundraiser - Candy Sales for Little League

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My kids are selling candy bars as a Little League fundraiser. You’ve been generous in the past by buying popcorn from their Cub Scout pack, so I figured that maybe some of you would be interested in helping out here as well. The thing is, it’s sort of hard to sell individual candy bars by mail. I think they’d be broken and melted in the mail, not to mention that it’s not very cost effective to pay 50 cents to ship a $1 candy bar.

So here’s the pitch. Instead of shipping off a candy bar to you, I’ll give them to charity. You can help two organizations with a single donation. The candy bars are $1 each. For every dollar you donate, I’ll buy a candy bar and donate it to a local children’s charity in your name. You’ll be helping Little League and bringing joy to some needy children in the Sacramento area.

Donations close April 6, 2006.

To donate through PayPal, click the Donation button below (no credit card backed donations, please):

Update: Some people complained about using PayPal, so you can use Amazon too.

Clay Loveless
March 10, 2006 5:05 PM

First. :) Good luck, Adam

Mark
March 10, 2006 7:19 PM

What exactly were they complaining about with regards to PayPal????

Adam Kalsey
March 10, 2006 9:39 PM

Some people aren't exactly happy with some of PayPal's past business practices. Others just don't like the near monopoly status of PayPal. And some people have trouble using PayPal because they live outside the US.

This discussion has been closed.

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