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Newly Digital has been a great success thus far. There have been dozens of entries from all over the world. When I publised the concept, I had no idea if anyone would even bother to send in entries, but I’m glad you did. I’ve read all the stories and found some interesting blogs I didn’t know about before.

I read the stories and shared some of my favorites with friends. Now I’d like to share the best stories with you. These three stories do more than provide a simple chronology of computer ownership. They weave a story around their early computing experiences.

  • Newly Digital by Raena Armitage
    “I found that the part of my social life that began to be conducted via e-mail, web discussions, and in IMs was just as real and valid as my social life in the rest of the world. It�s not the same, it�s not a substitute, but it�s just as important in spite of - or because of - its different, mostly-text way of communicating”
  • Newly Digital: 1983 to Present by Roger Benningfield
    “I fell instantly in love with the idea of playing those games. Even more than that, I wanted to create them. I wanted to figure out how those moving images, joystick inputs, and high scores were processed. Having always been something of a dabbler, the multi-discipline approach to games creation in those days seemed incredibly attractive.”
  • Newly Digital by Ernie Hsiung
    “’Yeah, I’m getting our kid a Nintendo set. You should get your boy one.’ My dad would then look stunned, then grin, shaking his head excitedly. ‘No no no… he needs more homework!’ He emphasizes the word ‘homework,’ in case the neighbor confused it with any other word that could connotate anything even remotely enjoyable.”

Thanks to everyone who has participated so far. Keep those stories rolling in.

Raena
June 6, 2003 10:45 AM

Affirmative action! Affirmative action!! You picked a woman and a gay Asian! You are SO busted... ...uh, nothing. w00t! I'm flattered!

Trackback from synapse
June 6, 2003 12:01 PM

Meep!

Excerpt: Apparently I can still write! Adam Kalsey liked my Newly Digital contribution, and I got a nice note from a TMO reader. No, I'm not preening (well, maybe just a little), but this has been a good reminder to get off my bum and write more often, since o...

Roger Benningfield
June 6, 2003 12:30 PM

A woman, a gay asian, and a really weird white guy from Arkansas. Let's get that straight. And thanks, Adam. I haven't written anything longer than a few paragraphs in ages, so it was a fun exercise.

Trounca
June 11, 2003 2:42 PM

I just wrote a 'newly digital - again' cause being newly digital does not only mean 'back in the old days ...' But I had to find out that trackback was the only way to contribute. And I did not find a tool do so so. So I have to say: The idea is great. The storys are also. But please give non.MT-Users a chance to contribute also - or should this be a "newly digital in case you use MT'? ;o) Trounca

Adam Kalsey
June 14, 2003 11:58 AM

TrackBack is available in Radio, B2, and other blogging tools. But if you don't have a TrackBack-capable blogging tool, you can use Simpletracks to send a ping. http://kalsey.com/2003/06/simpletracks/

Trackback from Your Daily Cup O' Chris
June 18, 2003 6:34 AM

Newly Digital

Excerpt: Well, I guess I my time with computers has been relatively short (being only 13), so I'll write about my experiences with computers, so far, my first computer, learning to program html, php, and other various languages, and my experiences being a "geek" that is only 13 years old.

This discussion has been closed.

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