RSS-JSON (Or, RSS 3.0)

Freshness Warning
This article is over 10 years old. It's possible that the information you read below isn't current.

Why? Because someone needed to do it.

I give you Scripting News in JSON. Or as I like to call it, RSS 3.0.

{"status": 200, "entries": [{"date": "", "content": "<p>Gotta love em, because there’s no way they’re going to stop breaking what works, and fixing what don’t need no fixing.<\/p>\n\t\t\t\t<p><img src=\"http:\/\/images.scripting.com\/archiveScriptingCom\/2006\/12\/20\/tilted.jpg\" width=\"80\" height=\"124\" border=\"0\" align=\"right\" hspace=\"15\" vspace=\"5\" alt=\"A picture named tilted.jpg\" \/>I’ve been hearing, off in the distance, about something called JSON, that proposes to solve a problem that was neatly solved by <a href=\"http:\/\/www.xmlrpc.com\/spec\">XML-RPC<\/a> in 1998, the encoding of arrays and structs in a format that could easily be processed by all programming languages. The advantage being that you could easily support the protocol in any language that supported XML and HTTP, which, at the time, was quickly becoming all languages.<\/p>\n\t\t\t\t<p>Then came SOAP, a re-invention of XML-RPC, that I saw as the inevitable fussing that BigTechCo’s feel they have to do to give their software lock-in, make it impossible for another developer to reverse-engineer the profile they used, and make the documentation so broad and incomprehensible that it’s impossible to ever completely implement it. Competition-free open protocols. Microsoft and IBM succeeded at that, with help from Sun, leading to a backlash, some of it well-intentioned, and some of it hypocritically promoted by the very same people who made SOAP so difficult to program! Such chutzpah, but already the users were so confused they thought it was just geeks being difficult. <\/p>\n\t\t\t\t<p><img src=\"http:\/\/images.scripting.com\/archiveScriptingCom\/2006\/12\/20\/yankeeFan.jpg\" width=\"65\" height=\"85\" border=\"0\" align=\"right\" hspace=\"15\" vspace=\"5\" alt=\"A picture named yankeeFan.jpg\" \/>I said it then, you’d still need to come up with an object serialization format for REST apps, otherwise every app has to start from scratch, they could have used the one SOAP used (we defined a <a href=\"http:\/\/www.soapware.org\/bdg\">profile<\/a> called the Busy Developer’s Guide to make that possible), or god forbid, use the original one in XML-RPC, but maybe the new devs at various big Silicon Valley companies never heard about these proto-standards, or chose to re-invent anyway. They came up with this thing called JSON, that I kept saying to myself, \"You don’t even want to look.\"<\/p>\n\t\t\t\t<p>Today I looked. I read on <a href=\"http:\/\/www.niallkennedy.com\/blog\/archives\/2006\/12\/delicious-url-api.html\">Niall Kennedy<\/a> that del.icio.us has come up with an API that returns a JSON structure, and I figured, sheez it can’t be that hard to parse, so let’s see <a href=\"http:\/\/badges.del.icio.us\/feeds\/json\/url\/blogbadge?hash=742e44bd5d0ccfd3c64f07d226749079\">what it looks like<\/a>, and damn, <i>IT’S NOT EVEN XML!<\/i><\/p>\n\t\t\t\t<p>As Dr Phil <a href=\"http:\/\/www.scripting.com\/2006\/12\/19.html#twoNotesAboutTvShows\">asks<\/a>—What were they thinking?<\/p>\n\t\t\t\t<p>No doubt I can write a routine to parse this, but look at how deep they went to re-invent, XML itself wasn’t good enough for them, for some reason (I’d love to hear the reason). Who did this travesty? Let’s find a tree and string them up. Now.<\/p>\n\t\t\t\t<p>Ladies and gentlemen, boys and girls, this is why I’m fed up with Mountain View, Cupertino, Redwood Shores and Redmond. Give me Berkeley and New York any day. Silicon Valley is made up of little boys pulling their puds, constantly making love to each other, pretending the world revolves around them. <\/p>\n\t\t\t\t<p>End of rant. <\/p>\n\t\t\t\t<p><a href=\"http:\/\/scripting.wordpress.com\/2006\/12\/20\/scripting-news-for-12202006\/#comment-26223\">Discuss here<\/a>.<\/p>", "link": "http:\/\/www.scripting.com\/2006\/12\/20.html#godBlessTheReinventers", "id": "", "title": "God bless the re-inventers"}, {"date": 1166633192.0, "content": "<p>Assuming you agree, would you be willing to stand up with other Americans, and march together to stop the war in Iraq? <\/p>\n\t\t\t\t<p>Would you march in your hometown, or go to Washington to help save the lives of young Americans in Iraq?<\/p>\n\t\t\t\t<p>Will you hold a sign, a candle, say a prayer, sing a song, stand up and be counted?<\/p>\n\t\t\t\t<p>Perhaps Christmas Day is a day to take to the streets?<\/p>", "link": "http:\/\/www.scripting.com\/2006\/12\/20.html#timeToStandUp", "id": "http:\/\/www.scripting.com\/2006\/12\/20.html#timeToStandUp", "title": "Time to stand up?"}], "etag": "\"801cfe1f7124c71:194e\"", "title": "Scripting News"}

Jemaleddin
December 20, 2006 2:19 PM

What's surprising isn't that Winer is such a crazy old coot, it's that enough people still read him that I have to hear his rantings second-hand. Sigh.

Joshua Schachter
December 20, 2006 4:24 PM

Sigh.

Joseph Scott
December 20, 2006 4:54 PM

Oh man, that was good for laugh. RSS 3.0, I'm sure Dave would love to see that :-)

Your comments:

Text only, no HTML. URLs will automatically be converted to links. Your email address is required, but it will not be displayed on the site.

Name:

Not your company or your SEO link. Comments without a real name will be deleted as spam.

Email: (not displayed)

If you don't feel comfortable giving me your real email address, don't expect me to feel comfortable publishing your comment.

Website (optional):

Follow me on Twitter

Best Of

  • How not to apply for a job Applying for a job isn't that hard, but it does take some minimal effort and common sense.
  • Simplified Form Errors One of the most frustrating experiences on the Web is filling out forms. When mistakes are made, the user is often left guessing what they need to correct. We've taken an approach that shows the user in no uncertain terms what needs to be fixed.
  • The best of 2006 I wrote a lot of drivel in 2006. Here's the things that are less crappy than the rest.
  • Rounded corners in CSS There lots of ways to create rounded corners with CSS, but they always require lots of complex HTML and CSS. This is simpler.
  • Debunking predictions Read/Write Web's authors have some goofy predictions.
  • More of the best »

Recently Read

Get More

Subscribe | Archives

10

Recently

Physical camera shutter for Cisco Spark Board (Jul 6)
A 3d printable design for a camera shutter for a Cisco Spark Board
My Travel Coffee Setup (Jan 20)
What my travel coffee brewing setup looks like, and how you can build your own for under $100.
Turkey Legs (May 30)
Product naming gone awry.
Speaking for Geeks: Your Slides (Dec 17)
Tips and tricks for creating great slides.
Speaking for Geeks: Writing Your Talk (Dec 14)
Don’t wait until the night before the talk to write it. Crazy, I know.
Speaking for Geeks: Tell a Story (Dec 13)
Telling a story keeps your presentation focused, keeps your audience interested, and makes it easier for you to remember your talk.
Speaking for Geeks: Where to speak (Dec 11)
You've got a great idea for a talk. How do you find conferences to submit it to?
Speaking for Geeks: Getting your session accepted (Dec 10)
Your conference speaking submissions are not getting accepted because they're bad. Here's how to make them better.

Subscribe to this site's feed.

Elsewhere

Tropo
Voice and communications platforms, including Tropo and Phono. Work.
SacStarts
The Sacramento technology startup community.
Pinewood Freak
Pinewood Derby tips and tricks

Contact

Adam Kalsey

Mobile: 916.600.2497

Email: adam AT kalsey.com

AIM or Skype: akalsey

Resume

PGP Key

©1999-2017 Adam Kalsey.
Content management by Movable Type.