Relax your policies

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Guy Kawasaki has some suggestions for how to create phenomonal customer service in your company.

Don’t assume that the worst case is going to be the common case. There will be outlier abusers, yes, but generally people are reasonable. If you put in a policy to take care of the worst case, bad people, it will antagonize and insult the bulk of your customers.

RIAA anyone?

I’d extend this to cover all areas of a business. A company I once worked with was constantly concerned with this. "If we do X, some people might get our product for free." "If we do Y, some customers might potentially spend less money."

The company’s competitors are now doing X and Y and eating the company for lunch.


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