...and thanks for all the fish

Freshness Warning
This article is over 12 years old. It's possible that the information you read below isn't current.

Tagyu’s been shut down for now.

It was a good run, and the technology has some exciting implications. But in the end, information retrieval is expensive—the server power required is enormous. Although Tagyu was bringing in enough revenue to cover costs, it didn’t afford any room for growth.

Tagyu was never really a consumer play—the target market was companies that need classification services. The process of managing the technology, looking for funding, and working on sales turned out to be too much for a single entrepreneur to manage. Lesson learned: for a enterprise software startup, you need multiple founders or the funding to hire some help.

I have something else in development—something I’m very excited about. More on that in a day or so.

Ben Tremblay
August 16, 2006 1:17 PM

Shut down ... meh. Funny, I was going through my set of VC blogs (yes, again!) and ... dunno, I feel boxed in. I've argued for a long time (since before Moz) that there was a big gap between angels (conventional funding, VCs included) and OpenSource ... I seem to live in that gap. What you wrote about "covering costs but not allowing for growth" points right at the nut of it. all the best ben

Ian Fenn
August 17, 2006 3:38 AM

Sorry to hear the news, but I look forward to the new stuff coming up. All the best, Ian

Your comments:

Text only, no HTML. URLs will automatically be converted to links. Your email address is required, but it will not be displayed on the site.

Name:

Not your company or your SEO link. Comments without a real name will be deleted as spam.

Email: (not displayed)

If you don't feel comfortable giving me your real email address, don't expect me to feel comfortable publishing your comment.

Website (optional):

Follow me on Twitter

Best Of

Recently Read

Get More

Subscribe | Archives

Recently

Feature voting is harmful to your product (Feb 7)
There's a lot of problems with using feature voting to drive your product.
Encouraging 1:1s from other managers in your organization (Jan 4)
If you’re managing other managers, encourage them to hold their own 1:1s. It’s such an important tool for managing and leading that everyone needs to be holding them.
One on One Meetings - a collection of posts about 1:1s (Jan 2)
A collection of all my writing on 1:1s
Are 1:1s confidential? (Jan 2)
Is the discussion that occurs in a 1:1 confidential, even if no agreed in the meeting to keep it so?
Skip-level 1:1s are your hidden superpower (Jan 1)
Holding 1:1s with peers and with people far below you on the reporting chain will open your eyes up to what’s really going on in your business.
Do you need a 1:1 if you’re regularly communicating with your team? (Dec 28)
You’re simply not having deep meaningful conversation about the process of work in hallway conversations or in your chat apps.
What agenda items should a manager bring to a 1:1? (Dec 23)
At least 80% of a 1:1 agenda should be driven by your report, but if you also to use this time to work on things with them, then you’ll have better meetings.
Handling “I don’t have anything to talk about” in your 1:1s (Dec 21)
When someone says they have nothing to discuss, they’re almost always thinking too narrowly.

Subscribe to this site's feed.

Contact

Adam Kalsey

Mobile: 916.600.2497

Email: adam AT kalsey.com

Twitter, etc: akalsey

Resume

PGP Key

©1999-2019 Adam Kalsey.