Comments

Comments for Domain registration time

Excerpt: It’s time to renew the registration for kalsey.com and I’m evaluating my options and soliciting suggestions from the peanut gallery. Read the whole article…

billsaysthis
June 19, 2003 3:58 PM

I used directnic.com, $15/year, recently for a couple of purchases and can't complain.

Rich Manalang
June 19, 2003 4:04 PM

I use dotster as my registrar, but use zoneedit as my DNS (they're free). All I have to do is register my zoneedit's nameservers with dotster. I paid $28 for 2 years with dotster. Took about a day and a half to activate.

adampsyche
June 19, 2003 4:09 PM

Secureserver.net is like $9 a year, and believe it or not, they have great service. No complaints at all.

Chuck Lawson
June 19, 2003 4:26 PM

Count me as another vote for DirectNic -- I've got several hundred client domains with them, and for $15 a year, the service is excellent. Outside of the reasonably well-thought-out interface (compared to some other registrars), over the past three years, twice I've had situations on my end that required a quick "hand job" by the registrar to resolve stuff that would have rapidly turned into major client issues. Both times, I got a quick response, even though it was after hours, and they went the extra mile to make things happen fast for me. I can't recommend them highly enough. - Chuck

Richard
June 19, 2003 4:28 PM

I'm with NameCheap, and no complaints here either. $9 a pop.

Merlin
June 19, 2003 5:20 PM

Dotster has a nice special right now--$8.95 transfer includes de-spamified email in WHOIS records, _plus_ they add a year to whatever is left on your current registration. Pretty sweet. I also like their transfer status screen that shows you *exactly* where your transfer stands over the 2-7 days it usu. takes; the kind of thing VRSN/NSI would certainly never give you. :) Great geegaws for members too (domain monitoring, etc.).

Daniel Von Fange
June 19, 2003 5:25 PM

I've been using Dotster for a while, maybe 30 domains. Pros: Good Control Panel Inexpensive Domains Quick response to support form Cons: Lately the entire registration pages seem to have been covered with ad's for add-on on gimmicks. No phone support.

jon
June 19, 2003 7:13 PM

godaddy.com been with them for about 2 years, got 25 domains registered with them, easy to use control panel and payment options (auto-renew or not). forwarding is something like $6/year and includes masking if you need it. highly recommended. j.

jon
June 19, 2003 7:15 PM

whoops--probably as you've seen domain forwarding is free (it's the masking that costs), and they're only $8.95/year and i believe the .us domains are cheaper. i've not had a problem with them, transfers go through quickly, and changing DNS servers (if need be) for a domain is a snap.

Phillip Harrington
June 19, 2003 8:39 PM

I've used GoDaddy for over a year, have like 12 domains with them, and have never had a problem. Highly recommended for low-price and low-stress.

anthony
June 19, 2003 11:33 PM

Stargate Inc. http://www.stargateinc.com/ has been great for me.

Adam Rice
June 20, 2003 7:23 AM

Recently transferred my domains to godaddy. After the registration, I had a question, and called their support line. A human being answered on the first ring and actually had a helpful answer to my question.

Michael Pate
June 20, 2003 1:06 PM

I consolidated everything I had with budgetregister.com (which worked fine) and networksolutions.com (which was a pain) with godaddy.com. No regrets. Easy Interface to manage them from. And I love the idea of the locking feature.

Dane Carlson
June 20, 2003 3:33 PM

I use Domains Next. $9.95 a year and no hassles.

Adam Kalsey
June 20, 2003 4:06 PM

Thanks for all the help. I'm going to use Go Daddy based on price and the availability of phone support. Not that I'll ever use the phone support, but it's nice to know the option's there.

Richard Phillips
August 17, 2006 4:49 PM

If you're looking for very inexpensive registrars, visit TheDomainReview.com. They are currently listing domain name registrars for as low as $4.95.

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