...Cut once

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A reader from outside the US asked about the title of this weblog, “Measure Twice.” For those who have been wondering, it’s from the old carpenter’s adage, “measure twice, cut once.” The adage admonishes builders to plan carefully. Measure each board before you cut it, since once it’s been cut, you can’t undo the cut.

I adopted Measure Twice as the name for this blog because I often write about planning and testing software and Web projects. But more than that, it’s an adage that has a different meaning in agile or open source projects. Monitor what you build. Improve it. The first pass is never good enough. Tweak. Change. Improve. Measure twice.

Phillip Harrington
June 19, 2003 9:08 PM

I always think the first post is titled "Measure Twice" since it's so close to the content... Just one man's opinion. Although I did know what it referred to :-) Yay for me.

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